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“My friend who bought it for me, she has had an abortion before.” The influence of Ghanaian women’s social networks in determining the pathway to induced abortion
  1. Sarah D Rominski1,
  2. Jody R Lori2,
  3. Emmanuel SK Morhe3
  1. 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
  2. 2 Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
  3. 3 Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sarah D Rominski, Univ Michigan, 1111 E. Catherine St. Ann Arbor 48109, Michigan, USA; sarahrom{at}umich.edu

Abstract

Background Even given the liberal abortion law in Ghana, abortion complications are a large contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality. This study sought to understand why young women seeking an abortion in a legally enabling environment chose to do this outside the formal healthcare system.

Methods Women being treated for complications arising from a self-induced abortion as well as for elective abortions at three hospitals in Ghana were interviewed. Community-based focus groups were held with women as well as men, separately. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted until saturation was reached.

Results A total of 18 women seeking care for complications from a self-induced abortion and 11 seeking care for an elective abortion interviewed. The women ranged in age from 13 to 35 years. There were eight focus groups; two with men and six with women. The reasons women self-induce are: (1) abortion is illegal; (2) attitudes of the healthcare workers; (3) keeping the pregnancy a secret; and (4) social network influence. The meta-theme of 'normalisation of self-inducing' an abortion was identified.

Discussion When women are faced with an unplanned and unwanted pregnancy, they consult individuals in their social network whom they know have dealt with a similar situation. Misoprostol is widely available in Ghanaian cities and is successful at inducing an abortion for many women. In this way, self-inducing abortions using medication procured from pharmacists and chemical sellers has become normalised for women in Kumasi, Ghana.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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