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Giving information about the contraceptive implant using a DVD: is it acceptable and informative? A pilot randomised study
  1. Lucy Michie1,
  2. Sharon T Cameron2,
  3. Anna Glasier3,
  4. Anne Johnstone4
  1. 1Clinical Research Fellow, Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, and Chalmers Sexual Health Centre, Edinburgh, UK
  2. 2Consultant Gynaecologist, Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, and Chalmers Sexual Health Centre, Edinburgh, UK
  3. 3Honorary Professor, Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
  4. 4Research Nurse, Department of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, and Chalmers Sexual Health Centre, Edinburgh, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Lucy Michie, Chalmers Sexual Health Centre, 2A Chalmers Street, Edinburgh EH3 9ES, UK; michieluc{at}yahoo.co.uk

Abstract

Background To provide standardised information about the contraceptive implant (Nexplanon®), a digital video disc (DVD) was developed for use within a sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service in Edinburgh. The aim was to determine if the accuracy of information recalled after watching a DVD was comparable to that following a face-to-face consultation, and if patients found the use of a DVD acceptable.

Methods Fifty women attending an SRH service abortion clinic considering using Nexplanon for the first time agreed to be randomised to receive information about the implant either by (a) a DVD (n=35) developed using information taken from Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare guidance or (b) a face-to-face consultation (n=15). A structured interview was conducted immediately following the DVD/face-to-face consultation and by telephone 3 months later. A small number of participants from each group attended for in-depth interview.

Results Knowledge recall (e.g. expected side effects) immediately following each intervention was similar in both groups. Most of the women who watched the DVD felt it was helpful (89%), easy to understand (94%) and acceptable (69%). Subsequently 76% of participants were contacted successfully at 3 months. The majority of those who had watched the DVD agreed that it had been informative (93%) and would be happy to receive contraceptive information via a DVD in future (93%).

Conclusions The use of a DVD to provide patient information on Nexplanon is acceptable and informative, and may enhance patient consultations. A large randomised controlled trial may determine if provision of quality standardised information via DVD can improve uptake or continuation rates of long-acting reversible methods of contraception.

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