rss
J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care doi:10.1136/jfprhc-2013-100617
  • Article

Young men and the morning after: a missed opportunity for emergency contraception provision?

  1. Leslie F Clark7
  1. 1Behavioral Research Administrator, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  2. 2Assistant Professor, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  3. 3Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, McLane Children's Hospital, Temple, TX, USA
  4. 4Professor, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  5. 5Clinical Research Fellow, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Hospital–Panorama City, Panorama City, CA, USA
  6. 6Senior Research Manager, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  7. 7Associate Professor, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sheree M Schrager, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 5000 Sunset Blvd, Suite 701, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA; sschrager{at}chla.usc.edu
  • Received 25 February 2013
  • Revised 10 October 2013
  • Accepted 6 December 2013
  • Published Online First 24 January 2014

Abstract

Objectives Although adolescents and young adults of lower socioeconomic status (SES) are disproportionately affected by unintended pregnancies, research on experiences with emergency contraception (EC) in this population has lagged. Furthermore, it is unclear whether EC-related knowledge and behaviour varies between young men and women. This study investigated knowledge, attitudes and experiences with EC among low SES young men and women aged 18–25 years.

Methods One hundred and ninety-eight new enrollees at two Los Angeles primary medical care clinics completed surveys about their knowledge, past use and likelihood of using EC. Chi square (χ2) and regression analyses assessed gender differences in knowledge and attitudes.

Results Women were more likely than men to accurately answer questions about EC and its use. Across both sexes, accurate knowledge predicted future willingness to use EC. Only half the women and a third of men knew that EC could be directly dispensed by pharmacists; even fewer knew that the legal access age for EC was 17 years (13%) or that men could access EC from pharmacies for their female partners (24%). Although respondents most commonly reported that friends were their source of current information about EC, both men and women chose health care professionals as their desired source of future information about EC.

Conclusions Young men in this sample were significantly less knowledgeable than young women about EC. Educating young men about EC by health care providers during routine visits may be a unique opportunity to increase EC knowledge, access and use among low-income young couples to decrease undesired pregnancies.

Related Article

Free sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of JFPRHC.
View free sample issue >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article