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Comment on ‘Effects of injectable progestogen contraception versus the copper intrauterine device on HIV acquisition: sub-study of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial’
  1. Nirk Ericson Quispe Calla1,
  2. Rodolfo D Vicetti Miguel2,
  3. Thomas L Cherpes3
  1. 1 Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA; nirk.quispe@stanford.edu
  2. 2 Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA; vicettimiguel1@stanford.edu
  3. 3 Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA; cherpes1@stanford.edu
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nirk Ericson Quispe Calla, Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 94305-5119, California, USA; nirk.quispe{at}stanford.edu

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Hofmeyr et al. reported no significant differences in HIV acquisition in their randomised controlled trial (RCT) among South African women using injectable progestogens or copper intrauterine contraceptive devices (Cu-IUDs) for pregnancy prevention.1 Acknowledging their longitudinal study of 1290 HIV-negative women (with time from enrolment to follow-up HIV testing of about 20 months) was underpowered to identify modest differences in HIV risk, they concluded that larger RCTs will more definitively define the effect of specific contraceptives on HIV susceptibility. They also noted their trial was halted early because of plans to conduct a larger and more comprehensive RCT. This Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) Study was designed to compare HIV acquisition in women from sub-Saharan …

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