Article Text

PDF
Pain and pain relief with intrauterine device insertion
  1. Rebecca H Allen
  1. Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Rebecca H Allen, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905, USA; rhallen{at}wihri.org

Statistics from Altmetric.com

In this journal issue, Speedie and colleagues1 examine whether the type of stabilising forceps (single-toothed tenaculum vs atraumatic forceps) applied to the cervix during intrauterine device (IUD) insertion influences the pain perceived among women who have had a vaginal delivery. They randomised 100 parous women and found that mean pain scores at the time of forceps application on a 0–10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) were 1.5±1.8 for the single-toothed tenaculum and 1.2±1.6 for the atraumatic (Littlewoods) forceps (p=0.52). As expected, pain scores for IUD insertion itself were low among this group of women (3.3±2.1, single-toothed tenaculum vs 2.7±2.2, atraumatic forceps, p=0.10). This finding is similar to a randomised controlled trial performed in the USA comparing single-toothed and atraumatic tenaculum types among 80 women undergoing IUD insertion, approximately half of whom had experienced …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles