Article Text

PDF
Commentary on ‘Young parents’ views and experiences of interactions with health professionals': tools for engaging and supporting teenage parents to improve their lives
  1. Sofia Strömmer1,
  2. Wendy Lawrence2,
  3. Mary Barker3
  1. 1 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
  2. 2 Associate Professor of Health Psychology, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
  3. 3 Associate Professor in Psychology, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sofia Strömmer, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; ss3{at}mrc.soton.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Teenage parenthood typically results in poor outcomes for mother and baby.1 ,2 Children of teenage mothers are more likely to become teenage parents themselves, thus perpetuating the cycle of disadvantage. Evidence from the Family Nurse Partnerships suggests these outcomes could be ameliorated by positive practitioner–mother relationships.2 Practitioners who work with young parents during pregnancy and after birth are in a key position to support them to better manage their lives and health. If healthcare professionals lack the necessary skills to engage young parents effectively, they miss an opportunity to break …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles