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A retrospective evaluation of the intrauterine device in a patient population in Buenos Aires, Argentina
  1. Sherani R Jagroep1,
  2. Margaret S Pichardo2,
  3. Lia Arribas3,
  4. Graciela Heredia4,
  5. Elina Coccio5,
  6. Tia M Palermo6
  1. 1Education, Research and Training Associate, Physicians for Reproductive Health (work was conducted while at Stony Brook University), New York, NY 10018, USA
  2. 2Howard University College of Medicine, MS1 (work was conducted while at Stony Brook University), Washington DC, 20001
  3. 3Obstetrician Gynecologist, Department of Gynecology, Hospital Bernardino Rivadavia, Buenos Aires Ministry of Health, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  4. 4Obstetrician Gynecologist, Department of Gynecology, Hospital Bernardino Rivadavia, Buenos Aires Ministry of Health, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  5. 5Obstetrician Gynecologist, Department of Gynecology, Hospital Bernardino Rivadavia, Buenos Aires Ministry of Health, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  6. 6Assistant Professor, Program in Public Health, Department of Preventative Medicine, Stony Brook University (State University of New York), Health Sciences Center 3-021, Stony Brook, NY 11790, USA
  1. Correspondence to Miss Sherani R Jagroep, Physicians for Reproductive Health, 55 W. 39th Street, Suite 1001, New York, NY 10018, USA; sherani.jagroep{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background The intrauterine device (IUD) is a long-acting reversible contraceptive method that is safe for a wide range of women, including adolescents and nulliparous women. Globally, it is often underutilised due to misperceptions among patients. Examination of characteristics associated with IUD discontinuation including adverse effects and IUD expulsion can inform provider practices to improve contraception success and patient satisfaction with this method. We studied IUD performance at a public family planning clinic in Buenos Aires, Argentina, serving a predominantly immigrant, low-income population.

Methods We conducted a retrospective evaluation of 1047 IUD insertions between 2002 and 2007 with 5 years of follow-up data. We performed bivariate and survival analysis to examine characteristics associated with IUD discontinuation: adverse outcomes including pain, bleeding, and IUD expulsion, and time to removal.

Findings Of 1047 patients, only 188 (18%) had their IUD removed within 5 years. The main causes of IUD discontinuation were involuntary (38%) reasons such as an IUD expulsion and personal choice (34%) such as desiring pregnancy.

Conclusions Findings suggest overall good long-term performance with IUD insertion, with minimal complaints or adverse outcomes. These findings may help to support providers serving similar populations in promoting this method.

  • intrauterine devices
  • long-acting reversible contraception

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