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Willingness of young men and women to be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis in three non-medical settings in Glasgow, UK
  1. Karen Lorimer, BA, PhD, Research Associate1,
  2. Margaret E Reid, BA, PhD, Professor2 and
  3. Graham J Hart, BA, PhD, Director3
  1. MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
  2. University of Glasgow, Public Health and Health Policy, Glasgow, UK
  3. Centre for Sexual Health … HIV Research, University College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Karen Lorimer, MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow G12 8RZ, UK. E-mail: karen{at}sphsu.mrc.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective To assess the willingness of young men and women to be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis in three non-medical settings.

Methods Men and women aged between 16 and 24 years were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire and provide a urine sample in non-medical settings: 'education' (one further education college), 'health and fitness' (three local authority leisure centres) and 'workplace' (two call centres).

Results Eighty-four percent of age-eligible users approached in the settings agreed to complete a questionnaire (n = 363). Among the sexually active people (n = 346), the uptake of screening varied by setting [education 19.1% (22/115), health and fitness 48.8% (62/127), workplace 27.8% (29/104); p<0.001]. Health and fitness settings (OR 4.08; 95% CI 2.04–8.14) and perception of being at risk of having chlamydia (OR 2.47; 95% CI 1.33–4.58) were strong predictors of providing a urine sample. Adjusting for setting and age group (<20 years vs 20+ years), women were less likely than men to provide a urine sample (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.26–0.70). All five positive cases (4.4%; 4.9% in men, 3.8% in women) were contacted with their results by a health adviser and invited to be treated at a local genitourinary medicine clinic.

Conclusions Men were more willing than women to be tested for C. trachomatis in these non-medical settings, but uptake varied by setting. Thus, increasing opportunities for the take-up of testing in particular non-medical settings might be a more effective approach to including young men who are not reached by clinic control efforts.

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