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A qualitative study of women's use of emergency contraception
  1. Louise A Keogh, MA, PhD, Research Fellow
  1. Key Centre for Women's Health in Society, Department of Public Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Louise A Keogh, Key Centre for Women's Health in Society, Department of Public Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. Tel: +61 3 8344 4333. Fax: +61 3 9347 9824. E-mail: l.keogh{at}unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Background While the use of emergency contraception (EC) is becoming more widespread in Australia, little is known about the reasons for, and the social context of, this use.

Methods In order to explore the use of EC from the perspective of users, a qualitative study was conducted with women presenting to one of three health care settings in Melbourne, Australia for EC.

Results Thirty-two women ranging in age from 18 to 45 years were interviewed. While a number of themes were discussed with the women, this paper reports on four ‘types of users’ of EC identified from the data. ‘Controllers’ experienced failure of their contraceptive method and were very uncomfortable needing EC. They changed their contraceptive strategy in an attempt to avoid needing EC in the future. ‘Thwarted controllers’ were similar to controllers except that they could not improve their contraceptive strategy due to medical or social limitations. ‘Risk takers’ saw the use of EC as a component of their overall contraceptive strategy. They did not rely on EC regularly, but were comfortable to use it occasionally when the need arose. A final group of women were ‘caught short’ by a sexual experience that was unplanned and therefore they did not manage to use their chosen contraceptive strategy.

Conclusions The findings from this study challenge the assumptions that are often made about the users of EC and highlight the need to acknowledge the different ways that women make sense of, and make decisions about, contraception.

  • Accepted April 28, 2005.

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  • Accepted April 28, 2005.

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