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Opportunistic screening for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection and partner follow-up in family planning clinics in three Scottish cities
  1. Ahilya Noone, MSc, FFPHM, Consultant Epidemiologist1,
  2. Aileen Spiers, BSc, RM, Research Nurse2,
  3. Gwen Allardice, PhD, CStat, Lecturer3,
  4. Susan Carr, MRCOG, DFFP, Consultant in Family Planning and Reproductive Health4,
  5. Gillian Flett, FRCOG, MFFP, Consultant in Family Planning and Reproductive Health Medicine5,
  6. Audrey Brown, MRCOG, DFFP, Head of Family Planning and Well Woman Service6 and
  7. Sara Twaddle, MSc, PhD, Head of Research and Development7,*
  1. Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Glasgow, UK
  2. The Sandyford Initiative, Glasgow, UK
  3. Department of Statistics and Modelling Science, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK
  4. The Sandyford Initiative, Glasgow, UK
  5. Square 13, Golden Square, Aberdeen, UK
  6. Carnegie Clinic, Dunfermline, UK
  7. Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow, UK
  1. Correspondence Dr Ahilya Noone, Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Clifton House, Clifton Place Glasgow G3 7LN, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 141 300 1100. E-mail: ahilya.noone{at}scieh.csa.scot.nhs.uk

Abstract

Three large urban family planning clinics (FPCs) in Scotland participated in a study to examine the implications of opportunistically offering urine testing for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection and FPC follow-up of positive women and of their male partners. Ninety-eight percent (3029) of women accepted the test. The prevalence of infection was 5.2% and this decreased significantly with age. There was no significant difference in prevalence between centres. Ninety-one percent of positive women intended to inform at least one partner about their infection status. Pretest counselling took about 10 minutes per woman while management (excluding full screening for sexually transmitted infections) of positive women took an additional 10 minutes. Screening in the FPC is acceptable to many women and to some of their male partners. Training and resources for administration and staffing are required if opportunistic screening is to be implemented.

  • Accepted January 11, 2004.

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  • Accepted January 11, 2004.

Footnotes

  • * Current post: Director, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh, UK

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