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A study on the knowledge and practice of contraception among men in the United Arab Emirates
  1. Saad Ghazal-Aswad, DFFP, FRCOG, Associate Professor1,
  2. Syeda Zaib-Un-Nisa, MB BS, Medical Officer2,
  3. Diaa E E Rizk, MD, MRCOG, Associate Professor3,
  4. P Badrinath, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor4,
  5. Huda Shaheen, MSc, Research Fellow5 and
  6. Nawal Osman, BSc, PhD, Research Technician6
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates (UAE) University, Al-Ain, UAE
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Tawam Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE
  3. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, UAE
  4. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, UAE
  5. Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain, UAE
  6. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, UAE
  1. Correspondence Dr S Ghazal-Aswad, PO Box 17666, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates. Tel: +971 3 7672000. Fax: +971 3 7672067. Email: saad.ghazal_Aswad{at}uaeu.ac.ae

Abstract

Objective To determine the knowledge and practice of contraception among United Arab Emirates (UAE) men.

Design Cross-sectional survey.

Participants Four hundred UAE monogamously married men with children.

Method The participants were randomly selected from the community and interviewed about knowledge and practice of contraception using a structured questionnaire.

Results A total of 348 men (87%) gave consent to participate in the study. Two hundred and ninety-four participants (84.5%) were aware of the availability of male contraceptive methods but only 94 (27%) were currently using these methods; 39 (41.5%) used condoms, 30 (31.9%) practised coitus interruptus, 24 (25.5%) practised the rhythm method and only one (1.1%) had been sterilised. Male contraception was accepted by 116 (33.3%) subjects of the total study population. The reasons for the objections were: religious 133 (57.3%), cultural barriers 47 (20.3%), personal beliefs 29 (12.5%), medical disorders 18 (7.8%) and economical factors five (2.2%). Of 54 users of condoms and coitus interruptus, 16 (29.6%) reported to have experienced adverse effects that included testicular pain in six (37.5%), decreased libido in six (37.5%) and diminished orgasm in four (25%). There were significant associations between using male contraception and levels of education of the partners (male p < 0.007, female p < 0.01), low family size (p = 0.0001) and family income (p < 0.05). Fifty-seven subjects (19.4%) thought that a 'male contraceptive pill' is available and 44 (15.0%) believed that a monthly injection is available for men.

Conclusions The level of awareness of contraception among men attending primary care in UAE is moderate. Two-thirds of the study subjects objected to the use of contraception by their wives and less than 20% practise contraception themselves. This is partly due to sociocultural traditions, religious beliefs and poor knowledge.

  • Accepted July 31, 2002.

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  • Accepted July 31, 2002.

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